Microsoft Interview Question Software Engineer / Developers




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1
of 1 vote

nlogn/4GHZ=10^10*log(10^10)/(4*10^9)=25sec

- Anonymous on September 11, 2008 | Flag Reply
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0
of 0 votes

I thought the way you had thought... since billion = 10^9 (not 10^10) it becomes 2.25 sec. which is hard to believe (:
But we only think the cpu speed, data transfer from memory to cpu and other operational stuff, will decrease the performance. Also we assume that cpu is not doing anything but our sorting operation.

- Mehmet on November 09, 2008 | Flag
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0
of 0 votes

nlog(n) is the complexity. Not the number of instructions! it could be 10^100000*nlog(n).

- Dom on September 05, 2013 | Flag
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1
of 1 vote

Can any one explain how all this is working here? I mean I'm confused with 4GHz, how do we count the fastness of a computer from its GHz? any layman's terms would be really appreciated :)

- Anonymous on April 17, 2009 | Flag Reply
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0
of 0 votes

Hertz is a measure of electric cycles per second (as in, the electrical signal on an oscilloscope would complete one full cycle, from baseline, to peak, to baseline, to trough, to baseline). For processors, one calculation can be performed per cycle.

So...
1 HZ = 1 processor cycle (calculation) per second

Giga is the prefix that indicates billions, so

1 GHZ = 1 billion calculations per second
4 GHZ = 4 billion calculations per second

- isochronous on October 30, 2009 | Flag
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0
of 0 vote

>>make any assumptions you wanted..
Khoa what if I assumed that numbers are already sorted, then i just need one pass thrugh 1 billion numbers to confirm that they are already sorted.

Anyways the above assumptions may not impress anybody so I believe if all the 1 billion numbers could fit in memory then i would go for any inplace O(nlogn) algorithm .. personal choice would be quick sort(randomized version) or even heap sort is also not a bad idea.

is this problem vague just to test the candidate as where he goes with assumptions ?

statistical info abt the data could really help in choosing abt the algorithm.

- algooz on April 23, 2008 | Flag Reply
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0
of 0 vote

Long as in how many seconds/minutes/hours it would take. Not asking for big O notation here.

- vodangkhoa on April 23, 2008 | Flag Reply
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0
of 0 vote

Can only roughly guess. 6.96 second?

- Anonymous on July 02, 2008 | Flag Reply
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0
of 0 vote

4GB memory can not store 1billion numbers. So....

- Anonymous on October 14, 2008 | Flag Reply
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0
of 0 votes

And why exactly not?

4 GB = 2^2 X 10 ^ 9

1 billion = 10 ^ 9

Assuming 1 integer is 4 bytes, 1 billion numbers take 4 GB memory. Also, the question says we have more than 4 GB available.

- DJ on January 24, 2009 | Flag
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0
of 0 vote

for me it comes to 7.5 sec...
nlogn/4GHZ (n=1 billion = 2^30 or 10^9 as per US...also 1G=2^30)
= [1024^3 * log( 1024^3)] / [4 * 1024^3]
= [2^30 * log(2^30)] / [4 * 2^30]
= [2^30 * 30] / [4 * 2^30]
= 30/4 = 7.5 sec

- Anonymous on November 25, 2008 | Flag Reply
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0
of 0 vote

do you all really think that CPU has the same speed with memory and the cpu can access to memory immediately? and there is also RAM latency
it is just the cpu clock time. what about memory access, copy cache operations, they are the time consuming ones.

- safakm on August 14, 2009 | Flag Reply


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